Garden Blahblahblog

mattdoux:

That feel when It’s the middle of June and you live in Florida and the aftermath of Beryl has saturated the ground so much that all your tomatoes are spindly and diseased and on their way out while gardening blogs you follow from the north all start posting pics of their “first tomatoes of the year!!!!!” and look forward to a good 2-3 months of production while you look forward to a good 2-3 months of NOTHING…


it feels bad man

Otherblog garden sentiments.

But yeah, not much luck in these next two months! Sadsad.

Status Report: June 2012.

Tropical Storm Beryl flew in a few weeks ago, heralding a daily afternoon thunderstorm every night for what’s seemed like a month now. This little guy made a habit of burrowing into my potted plants when I brought them in from the crazy winds.

Beryl and her sister storms have left the ground saturated beyond belief. Even the top of the backyard hill is spongey and swamplike, the lake higher than I’ve seen it for a couple of years.

On one hand, I’m fond of storms, and a reliably cloudy sky makes for a cooler summer than usual. On the other hand, my tomatoes are well on their way out: gangling, leafless, sickly shadows of their former vigorous growth. Thick-skinned,  stretch-marked, watered-down-flavorless fruits bursting on the plants and invaded by fruit flies, stinkbugs and whitefly. Not a pretty sight.

The corn this year also pales in comparison to my mostly positive first try. That fault is more my own, having planted the Silver Queen in the exact same spot as last year (crop rotation anyone???) and neglected the regular doses of liquid fertilizer largely responsible for last year’s success. 

Needless to say I have a long laundry list of things “NOT TO DO” next spring/summer, but for now I am focusing on rennovation planning for the fall season and getting my hands on a cover crop for the months in-between.

I suppose I could take the leap and baby some whole new tomato and zucchini plants. The potted black beauty eggplants are actually in their prime! But frankly, trying too hard in this defeating weather is just kinda depressing.

mattdoux:

So here are some better shots of that ceramic strawberry pot I did. I planted basil in the half-cups recently since the parsley will be on its way out in a few months. 

The basil is much taller now. Thought I’d share this garden-related art on my rather neglected garden blog!!

mattdoux:

Goings-ons in the garden. A ceramic “strawberry pot” with facial features I made last semester that’s now holding some Parsley and Cilantro (that’s yet to come up.) My avacado tree in the background and bay leaf to the side….

Also a doki Peruvian Daffodil that’s blooming in the front yard.

Currently researching what to grow as a cover crop in northern Florida after a monthlong deluge causing most of my corn and tomatoes to kick the bucket. I need something that I can seed in June/July and that will be ready to till before the fall garden needs to be planted in September.  My lead so far seems to be tropical legumes. I want something nitrogen-fixing, subsoil-penetrating, organic matter encouraging, fast-growing and most importantly, HEAT TOLERANT. 

((Lemme know if you’ve got any advice!!))

nybg:

mothernaturenetwork:

As more and more Americans grow their own fruits and vegetables, MNN digs up some dirt on this DIY food revolution.

Do you garden because it saves you money? Do you garden for exercise? For love? Do you garden at all? What is your motivation?

I am 19, Florida, and do indeed grow mostly tomatoes. I food-garden because everything I’ve ever grown tastes better than its grocery store counterpart. In the summer my 6-person family goes for many months without buying some vegetables and my goal is to reach the productivity level of never having to buy produce at all, and being content with the bounty of whatever’s in-season. Kind of a pipe dream for a culture so spoiled with access to tomatoes, potatoes and lettuce year-round, but self-sufficiency is definitely an attractive and attainable ideal!

nybg:

mothernaturenetwork:

As more and more Americans grow their own fruits and vegetables, MNN digs up some dirt on this DIY food revolution.

Do you garden because it saves you money? Do you garden for exercise? For love? Do you garden at all? What is your motivation?

I am 19, Florida, and do indeed grow mostly tomatoes. I food-garden because everything I’ve ever grown tastes better than its grocery store counterpart. In the summer my 6-person family goes for many months without buying some vegetables and my goal is to reach the productivity level of never having to buy produce at all, and being content with the bounty of whatever’s in-season. Kind of a pipe dream for a culture so spoiled with access to tomatoes, potatoes and lettuce year-round, but self-sufficiency is definitely an attractive and attainable ideal!

mattdoux:

Picked a bunch of eggplant and tomatoes before the incoming tropical storm….and holy crap we have a lot. I picked everything that was ripe two days ago!!! JEEZY

TOO MANY TOMATOES

mattdoux:

The Mimosa tree I grew from seed 6 or 7 years ago recently “went through puberty”. At seven feet tall, arching and invading the front garden beds when the roots broke through it’s 5 gallon pot, it has finally produced its first few flowers!!!

May 9 2012